Let’s take a look at … – CMYW

CMYW is a fun little arcade shooter that fans of Asteroids and other retro-style space games will definitely appreciate. The goal is simple- shoot enemy ships, collect the resources they leave behind after exploding, and take these resources to your portal. While doing this, you must protect your portal and yourself from being hit by these enemies.

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CMYW features extremely basic and colorful graphics that are reminiscent of the old vector displays from the 70s. You command an old-school looking triangle ship that ejects a tiny little spaceman when hit. Likewise, enemies are simple polygons and the resources they leave behind after you shoot them are yet smaller polygons. Pair the graphics with a fun and high-energy soundtrack and the game is perfect for a space atmosphere.

The goal of the game is to defeat enemies, collect resources and get them to your portal safely. The farther away you get from your portal, the more the map zooms out. There is also a minimap that shows where all your enemies are and stops you getting lost in space. Some enemies carry special items that change your weapons or give you boosts, and as the game goes on the threat level increases.

CMYW offers both keyboard and controller options, both take some getting used to, but you can adapt to either with plenty of practice. I prefer the controller, and it took me awhile to get a hang of spinning, moving, and shooting efficiently without floundering around all over the map. I had the hardest time with spinning just enough to aim right where I needed to. I would prefer if we could re-bind the keys to fix my issue with choosing to move instead of shoot, but I think that’s the main challenge of the game- mastering the controls so you can rack up the highest score possible.

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 Game modes include single player, local multiplayer (up to four players), cooperative, and competitive.  Score hunters will appreciate the leader boards as well. Overall, I liked this game but grew frustrated by all the mistakes I kept making with the controls. It’s definitely gratifying blowing up all those enemies and collecting resources, and dying always causes a bunch of frustrated yelling and laughing before deciding to try one more time… one more time….

 Tl-dr I would recommend this simple but challenging game to anyone who likes arcade-style shooters, especially for the tiny $3.99 price tag.

 Rating – 8/10

 Purchase – Steam £2.79/$3.99

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Let’s talk about … – Sol Trader is back on Kickstarter

Earlier in the year we covered Sol Trader, an in-depth space sim from Chris Parsons. If you missed that article you can check it out here. After the first Kickstart fell short of its target, raising £9,251/£20,000, Sol Trader is back with a second Kickstarter campaign, this time only looking for half the original goal, £10,000.

We had a quick play of Sol Trader when the first Kickstarter launched, and one of the things we loved was the depth of gameplay and the social aspects of gameplay: it seems we weren’t alone. After feedback from both players and industry, gameplay has been re-written to place even greater emphasis on these features. There’s also been lots of work put into the graphics, so the game is prettier than ever.

To coincide with the new Kickstarter, a fresh demo is available showing the current state of the game. Bear in mind, some features promised in the Kickstarter are not yet available.

Here’s a full feature list taken from the Kickstarter page:

  • Single-player combination of arcade 2D spaceflight and strategic manipulation of your network of contacts
  • Run missions using your family and friends’ connections to government or business
  • No ship given to you at game start: you must take a loan and hire a ship, or borrow one from a wealthy relative
  • Fly between planets, interacting with the various characters you come across in cities and in space
  • Research information on other characters through chatting to friends and relatives
  • Customise your ship with lasers, passenger quarters, shields, bolt weapons, missiles and scanners (coming soon)
  • Blackmail others with the information you find, or sell it to the press (coming soon)
  • Trade goods for profit
  • Procedural generation of a whole society of thousands of random characters
  • Start every new game from your character’s birth
  • Choose your parents and all your major life choices as you grow up
  • Your choices determine your personality and your friends, relatives and enemies
  • Full modding support: change all the organisations, events, weapons, planets, ships, conversations and tutorial system.
  • Windows, Mac and Linux at launch
  • Already greenlit on Steam

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We liked what we played of Sol Trader, and will be picking up the new demo soon! It was also Greenlit earlier this year, so there’s certainly the audience, it just needs a little help getting across the finish line. Head to the Kickstarter to show your support, or visit the official website for more information on the game.

Let’s take a look at … – STASIS

STASIS is a sci-fi point-and-click adventure game from The Brotherhood. Kickstarted back in 2013, STASIS received $132,523 of its $100,000 target, and today launches on both Steam and GOG. Inspired by the game Sanitarium, and made by a one-man-band Chris Bischoff over the past five years, STASIS promises a true, horror sci-fi experience. Let’s take a look.

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STASIS starts with an awesome, movie-like introduction, showing a ship flying through space. The music, art, and direction show clearly already that the title is not lacking production value. You wake up on an abandoned ship, fresh out of a stasis chamber, with no recollection of what’s happened. The last thing you remember is you, your wife, and your daughter were heading to Titan.

You are alone. Not only on the ship, but in regards to gameplay and problem solving; you are truly on your own. There are no goals, no objectives, and no tips on where to go next. Only through meticulous exploration of your environment, and taking careful note of your surroundings, and the scraps of information provided, will you be able to progress.

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Gameplay is typical of point-and-click adventure, and the isometric environments help pull you into the environment. The art utilizes pre-rendered 3D environments, with a gritty, film-grain like layer atop. It creates a very grungy atmosphere, that when coupled with the ambient backing track, and the terrifying sounds the ship makes, creates a very tense and uneasy feeling.

The music and sound in STASIS go a long way, and thanks to the highly successful Kickstarter campaign, two world class musicians, Mark Morgan and Daniel Sadowski worked on the project. Same goes for the excellent voice acting. The Kickstarter funds also allowed professional voice actors Ryan Cooper, and Rebecca McCarthy to join the project. All interaction is excellently narrated which goes further in immersing you in the experience.

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The game starts somewhat slowly at first. You’ve taken damage and are ill, so can’t move too fast. Your first task is to find medical help. You come across an old machine that can help, and the first puzzle presented is to get it up and running. This is a great example of how the game doesn’t molly-coddle you, and leaves it up to you. There are no prompts on where to go. No suggestions on how things work, you just have to work things out. There is a circuit breaker on the wall, and to learn how to use it you have to press all the buttons and see what happens. It’s authentic, and the sense of adventure and the unknown is great.

Information is gained by exploring items, and reading computer terminals. Often, things like this can feel disjointed from the task at hand, and somewhat superfluous. Asif you’re going out of your way to learn extra, non-critical information, but not with STASIS. Everything is relevant to the storyline, and you need to gather the information in order to continue. It’s just you, the operating system that runs the ship, and your intrigue.

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After more delving, and puzzle solving, you discover that you appear to be on a scientific research ship that’s been running for 50 years. How long you’ve been here for god only knows. As you explore the ship further things start taking a turn for the macabre. Corpses lie in empty corridors, screams radiate throughout, and shadows of creatures scurry past the edges of your vision. I’ve also come across another human, and have been instructed to leave the area I’m in immediately. Things are ramping up, and I’m looking forward to seeing where they’re taking me.

Narrative plays a large part in what makes STASIS great. Diligent reading and exploration will yield the greatest results, and you’ll get out of it what you put it. I think if you rush through it, just solving the puzzles in order to move forward, you might have a lesser experience.

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I’m about an hour and a half into STASIS, and it’s clear that a rich and well produced journey lies ahead. A grungy and rich aesthetic makes the environments real, and the excellent voice acting brings the characters to life. I love the fact that the game really leaves you in your own. It’s a true adventure game, not ‘Go Here, Do This, Collect That’. If you don’t have a sharp mind and approach the environment diligently you won’t get too far. For fans of adventure games, STASIS is a must-play.

Tl:dr – STASIS is a sci-fi, horror, point and click adventure game. With great production value, including the effort of great musicians, and professional voice actors, a fitting world is created to host the rich narrative. It doesn’t hold your hand, and it requires a sharp mind and key eye to progress. You’ll get out of it what you put in, and if you invest in it you will be rewarded with a great experience.

Rating – 8.5/10

Purchase – Steam £18.99 | GOG £18.99 (£15.29 with launch discount)

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Let’s take a look at … – Interstellar Marines (Early Access)

Interstellar Marines is a science fiction FPS with quite the history. Currently in development by Zero Point Software, the game has been in development since 2005 under the working title Project IM. After being Greenlit in late 2012, a Kickstarter was launched to fund the rest of the game, but it unfortunately fell short of its target: $157,907/$600,000 was raised.

Since mid-2013 Interstellar Marines has been available in Early Access on Steam. That’s quite a run in Early Access! Let’s take a look.

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The official website states that IM will take you through three massive campaigns, taking you through mankind’s first contact with a sentient alien species. The gameplay currently available in Early Access appears to be the pre-cursor to this storyline. You play as a soldier who has been specially selected to join the Interstellar Marines, and you play through training.

On starting the game for the first time you’re greeted with an epic introductory cut scene. It looks great and production value is through the roof. It got me really excited to get playing! This quality carries right through into the game models and environments. It’s a looks great, and even in early access I had only a few very minor graphical glitches. The same can’t be said for UI. It feels empty, and unfinished. Not a fan, and I hope it gets an upgrade before the game leaves early access.

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My favourite thing about Interstellar Marines is how it feels. It’s solid and different than a lot of shooters. The closest thing it reminded me of was Battlefield. You feel more connected to the character, and movement feels real. It’s the little things like how your sight sways, and if you become out of breath they will sway more as you recover. Weapons give a lot of kickback, so you can’t just spray and prey. You have to pick your shots, and use your weapon wisely.

At the time of writing this article, the game supports keyboard and mouse only, so those that like to play their shooters with a controller are out of luck. I would however encourage those pad users to give the game a go with mouse and keyboard. You may find yourself pleasantly surprised.

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Up until this point Interstellar Marines has a good first impression. It looks pretty good, I like the controls, they feel solid, and the overall production is great minus some lacking UI. As we now come to take a look at gameplay however things ramp down a gear.

There are currently 2 campaign missions available, and both are training exercises that take place in quite small environments with equally small goals. Campaign 2 is longer than campaign 1, but they can both be completed in a short single sitting. There is also only a small collection of weapons available, and a single enemy. It’s all very sparse and demo-ey feeling, even for an early access title.

Alongside the 2 campaigns, and a tutorial level, there are a selection of scenarios such as survival and escape. These can be played in either singleplayer or online multiplyer, although I could only find a couple of multiplayer games live that were both for survival.

Gameplay itself is very unforgiving. The campaigns do not have any checkpoints, so if you die during the mission that’s it. It adds a real sense of fear, and make you feel very vulnerable which is great. It can be frustrating when a robot that you can’t see shoots you, and the mission re-starts, but I enjoyed the challenge. I was playing on normal, and it doesn’t take many bullets to kill you. There are also two difficulty levels available above normal, so I can only presume they are insta-death!

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I was unsure whether to include this next section or not, but since it directly affects you as the consumer I decided to leave it in. The advertising of the game irks me greatly. I understand that when selling a product you want to make it seem amazing, you really have to sell it. But Interstellar Marines has lists upon lists of selling points that just shouldn’t be there. Here are a few from the list of current features:

  • Shoot from hip or look through the Red Dot scope for increased accuracy.
  • Full-body first person character simulation (no more floating hands!) with a physics-based dynamic character controller.
  • Toggleable tactical flashlight for when it’s pitch black.
  • Toggleable laser to assist your aim (no crosshairs).

These are all standard things that every FPS has. It’s like selling a car and going ‘Look. It has wheels and doors.’ Well, it’s a car, so obviously it has wheels and doors, what else does it do? This may seem pedantic, but this sensationalism is seen throughout the Steam page, the website, and all promotional material, and the game does not live up to how it’s sold. On the website you’re painted a picture that you’re about to receive an epic ‘AAA-Indie’ experience, but that’s just not the case. Not yet anyway.

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What gameplay is there is solid, it’s just there isn’t a lot of it! I enjoyed my time with it, but have no reason to go back to it. If you’re a big fan of shooters you’ll find reasons to like Interstellar Marines. But given the development history, and its current state, I’m not sure I’d actively suggest it right now, but keep an eye out.

Tl:dr – Interstellar marines is a promising shooter with controls that feel great and make it stand out amongst other shooters, and an interesting sounding story line. Its main problem right now is lack of content, and according to plenty of Steam reviews updates just aren’t coming frequently enough. Fans of shooters will find reasons to like it, but for casuals I’d suggest waiting until further into development.

Rating – 7/10

Purchase – Steam (Early Access) (£10.99)

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Let’s take a look at … – VoidExpanse

VoidExpanse is a space-based RPG from AtomicTorch Studio. It launched yesterday on Steam at a price of £10.99 (discounted to £9.89 until April 9th for launch). I’ve spent about an hour and a half in the game so far, and here’s what I think. Full disclosure, we received a review copy of the game.

VoidExpanse sees you in a Universe which is under threat from an alien race known as the Xengatarn. With a number of different factions available, each offering different perks, you must choose who to side with and get to work ridding the galaxy of the threat.

You start with a small, simple ship equipped with a puny lazer, a handful of currency and a number of tutorials to get you on your way. The controls and UI and nice and intuitive. I did have problems controlling my ship at first, but turning on auto turning helped with that. And with that you’re alone in the vast nothingness of space and your journey has begun.

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Throughout the galaxy systems there are large space hubs that you can dock your ship at. You’ll be spending a lot of your time here as it’s where you pick up quests, buy things, work on your ship and more. While in space you can equip small items to your ship knows as consumables, kind-of like small power-ups, but for anything significant like changing a part you’ll find yourself heading back to a base. Luckily there’s a nice map system that shows not only the system you’re currently in, but the entire world map. There’s also a cruise mode you can toggle and an auto pilot, so while travelling long distances is time consuming you can sit back and relax. Just watch for ganking pirates!

Okay. So you’ve joined a Faction, now what? Quests! At each base there are a number of different people available to talk to, and merchants will come and go as you spend time there. Talking to people around the space station will open up a bunch of different quests for you to do, offering a range of rewards and taking you off to different parts of the galaxy in your trusty ship.

As you explore you will encounter pirates to fight, comets to mine and other quests, each which will offer not only financial rewards, but skill points. VoidExpanse has a number of different skill trees where you can spend your points. You can level up your flying, combat, social skills and whatever class you chose when you created your character. I chose engineer!

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There’s a ton of customizability in VoidExpanse. From your world size, to your character class, your faction, lots of mod-ability to your ship and quest lines that appear to have multiple outcomes based on your decisions during them, each player will have a truly unique experience with the game. My play-time right now is about 1 and a half hours and I’m thoroughly in the swing of missions, upgrading and exploring.

Everything was going great until the game crashed on me for no reason! I was just managing my inventory and the dreaded ‘Not Responding’ message reared its ugly head. Hopefully it was a one-off crash caused by my own PC. The game does seems to autosave when you enter a space hub, as it picked up from there, so not much was lost. My only other niggle with the game is the music; not the quality, it’s great, but it’s presence. You will be just hanging at the station, upgrading your ship, and an epic score will be playing in the background. As I say, the quality of the music is awesome, but it seems to just play randomly and felt out of place quite a few times. I think it could be utilized better to create an atmosphere that matches your surrounding more closely.

That’s the extent of my criticism, the crash (which there seems to be no other reports of so I presume it was my PC?) and the music feeling out of place at times. I very much enjoyed my time in the game and will be returning to it shortly to make my way through a full game. The graphics are great, the quests are interesting, there’s a whole load of customizability and the overall polish is great.

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Outside of the single-player, the game features online multiplayer with fully persistent worlds, turning each server into its own mini MMORPG. I’ve yet to enter a server and play, but I certainly will be doing. Hope it’s not full of pirates! There’s also mod support, and already a few mods are available through Steam. I find that very promising as player creations and mods allow the game to offer much more, increasing its longevity with fresh, user-generated content. More bang for your buck.

Tl;dr – VoidExpanse is a very well-polished and engaging RPG. The quests are interesting and engaging, there’s lots of customizability, combat is fun and with multiple and mod support there should be plenty of fresh content and experiences to come out of the game. Lots of content for under a tenner!

Rating – 8/10
Purchase – Steam £10.99 (discounted to £9.89 until April 9th for launch)

 

Let’s take a look at … – The Spacials

The Spacials is a space colony management sim from the Carrasco brothers over at Weird and Wry; a small indie studio developed in 2014, Barcelona. It’s their debut title, and what an entrance. The Spacials is probably best described as Roller-coaster Tycoon in space, with a dynamic and randomly generated world around you. The game has been available in Early Access through their website, but today it lands on Steam as a full release. Let’s take a look.

The Spacials is set in a not too distant future where the human race is trying to establish itself out in the Universe. It’s your task to build a team of officers, explore the Universe around you, gather resources and build the most bad-ass space tourism spot you can to bring in as many visitors as possible and keep them happy.

It’s a fun and friendly implementation of a genre that has before put me off by its very nature. It’s not bogged down in numbers, meticulous details or terrifyingly complex interfaces, it’s all action and is presented in a succinct manner. This is further enforced through the aesthetics which are very light and cartoony, it’s a very nice style and compliments the gameplay and overall casual feel of the game well. Same goes for the soundtrack throughout. Its light ambiance feels perfectly at home in the game.

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The core of The Spacials is to gain resources and use them to build and maintain the best space tourism spot you can. Resources come in many shapes and sizes and are collected by completing missions on planets in the systems that you have unlocked, bounties and contracts. Once you complete a mission on a planet you unlock its resources and supply lines. The missions come in a variety of difficulties, so if you’re finding things a bit easy you can crank up the difficulty for a greater challenge.

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Combat when on these missions is rather unique, and is where the bulk of the action comes from. All combat is squad based. When you are selecting a mission, you will chose the officers that will comprise your squad. There are 5 classes of officer in the game, Strategist, Scientist, Diplomat, Engineer and Doctor, each with their own roles. For each mission there’s a slot available for 1 officer from each class, 5 total. So you pick your quad of 5 and start the mission, teleporting you to the planet in the process.

From this point on you’re on your mission on a randomly generated planet. The goals of the missions, at least all the missions I’ve played, are simple and along the lines of ‘Find X’, ‘Destroy X’ and don’t take too long to complete. You click the ground to move, your whole squad moves as one unit, and when you find an enemy you spam click the hell out of it; there’s no auto-fire. At first this bugged me, but after playing the game for a while I came too really like the combat.

Each officer has a special skill that gets mapped to the hot-keys 1-5. Having these different types of abilities really offers some verity to combat and your squad. Each of these abilities, and your officers’ weapons and passive abilities, can be changed and upgraded, so you can kit your squad out however you like and create some crazy combos for weapons and abilities.

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Once you have your resources you can return to you base, tend to your officers’ needs and work on your space tourism base. The goal is to get as many visitors as possible, and to keep them as happy as you can. The visitor screen will give a breakdown of all visitors currently at your base, and how happy they are. You use this to expand your base to accommodate the needs of your visitors. As you attract more visitors you need to provide a wider variety of accommodation and attractions, so you will have to pay a visit to the tech tree; the upgrade system of The Spacials.

Throughout your exploits on other planets, you will earn research points. These are spent at the technology tree on unlocking new build types, and there’s lots to choose from. There’s no rules on how you create and customize your base, so it’s really just down to your imagination.

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Once you have your resources, and whatever you want to build unlocked in the tech tree, then it’s time to start designing your tourism base. The building controls are easy and nice to use, although I think the UI surrounding it could do with some more polish. In fact, the UI and polish everywhere I think are a few patches short of being where they could be.

There is a nice tutorial that covers lots of the introduction to the game, but I think in general the UI and self-intuitiveness of it could be improved. Example. It took me ages to work out how to remove someone from an Embassy pots. (You can put your officers into the Embassy of a system to gain more resources from it). To remove someone from an embassy position, you have to assign an empty slot the position. I realise you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to work that out, but a remove button would have just been that much easier.

And that’s the focus of my criticism. There’s a whole bunch of tweaks that could be made to make it that much easier and just add a touch more polish. Things like tool-tips when you’re hovering over buttons, some of the UI overlaps in places when you do certain things, you can’t move items once placed, and the inventory system is somewhat cumbersome when it comes to kitting out your officers. Only small things, but given the genre, and especially the fact that this is a casual implementation of the genre, I think self-intuitiveness and UI design should be as perfect as can be and for me there’s still a bit of room for improvement.

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What I love most about The Spacials is that it makes the genre accessible. I’ve seen plenty of space sims before this, but they’ve always seemed like too much hard work! The Spacials captures the essence of a good sim without letting it get in the way of itself. Yes, I think there’s some issues with the UI and general self-intuitiveness of the interface in places and some of the actions, but these are minor. I think The Spacials is a great casual entry into the genre, and an awesome debut title from Weird and Wry.

Icing on the cake, it’s only £8.99; a nice cheap price for the amount of content and hours you will get out of the game. There’s also a launch sale, where the game will be 25% off until April 7th. Will you be playing The Spacials? We hope so. If you do, let us know what you thought of it in the comments.

Tl;dr – The Spacials is a fun and friendly implementation of a genre that has before put me off by its very nature. It’s not bogged down in numbers, meticulous details or terrifyingly complex interfaces, it’s all action and is presented in a succinct manner.  I very much enjoyed it. For those accustomed to their space sims this will be a nice casual experience, and for those like me that are new to it it’s a great entry point.

Rating – 7/10
Purchase – Steam £8.99 (excluding 25% launch sale until April 7th)

Let’s talk about … – Former AAA developer turns to Kickstarter to fund indie title Sol Trader

Chris Parsons is a former AAA developer who worked on titles such as Evil Genius and Republic: The Revolution for Elixir Studios. Three years ago he decided to return to his roots in writing his own video games as an independent developer. Enter Sol Trader; “a cross between Elite and Asteroids, with a deep and thematic storytelling RPG elements”.

For those of you into your sims this may be one to watch, and you can have your part in making it a reality. Sol Trader is currently looking for £20,000 on Kickstarter to bring it out of Alpha through to a finished project in 2015.

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Keen to distinguish Sol Trader from similar games in the genre, Chris posted the following on the games Kickstarter:

I decided to build a rich world history which allowed players to discover and forge their own story in the context of their family, upbringing and childhood. I wanted players to uncover secrets about their rivals that go back seventy years and use them against them. I wanted them work their uncle’s contacts in the senate to secure lucrative diplomatic missions. I wanted them to meet school bullies on the space lanes, and teach them a lesson.

Even in the Alpha builds of the game this shines through. Before you even start there’s a large number of decisions that you make that generates a full family history that you can browse. Each individual has a full breakdown of their life, their interactions with other people etc. it’s incredibly in-depth.

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Moving past the lore and depth of the world around you, while core mechanics are there, such as trading and combat, gameplay is a little thin. Given the game is in Alpha that’s hardly surprising so we’re going to hold off on a review until the game has progressed a little further and we can give it a fare shot.

If you like the sound of a space trading/exploring/shipbuilding/combat sim then check out the games Kickstarter and help get the game released in 2015. Sol Trader is also currently on Greenlight, so head over there to drop your vote.

Let’s take a look at … – Lost Orbit

Hello, my lovely indie gamers! Have you ever been lost in space? Hey, neither have I … and thank God for that! However, you’ll get your turn soon enough as this hopeless space mechanic from Lost Orbit, an outer-space obstacle course game from the PixelNAUTS studio! Currently available only as a playable demo, the game is in the process of joining other action or arcade games on Steam for PC!

As said once already, in Lost Orbit, you play as a guy lost in space. Other than on the game’s ABOUT page, there is no story you’ll find within the demo, especially not that his name is Harrison. The goal is to lead Harrison home, via a drag-style obstacle course, in which you must avoid gliding asteroids and machinery. Along the path are obtainium that you can collect to purchase upgrades (not available in the demo, however).

As you travel, you will encounter these obstacles that you must avoid flying into, along with the wall-like barriers the asteroids form. If you find yourself on the wrong edge of the course (even when trying to avoid other obstacles), you can fly towards the edge and you’ll end up on the opposite side via the game’s screen-wrap.

Getting into the game, you are accompanied by ambient electronic music and the cell-shaded graphic environment (if you don’t know what cell-shading is, refer to Borderlands’ graphics). At ‘Amazing!’ graphics, well, the setting says it all. The environment looks just that! Even at ‘Ok’ graphics, all you get is a slight blur on areas of surroundings and less anti-aliasing (better rounded edges), and still looks great! As for the music, it suits the mood. After all, I wouldn’t think Harrison’s in too much of a hurry, especially when the later he gets home, the fewer pieces he’ll be in! And, as said before, within the demo itself you will not find any story, and in the case of the demo, it’s not very relevant to the gameplay offered.

Acknowledging that Lost Orbit is not yet available, other than as a playable demo, there are a lot of things I personally could not comment on. The visuals and audio are fit for this kind of game. The controls are also fluid. My only real complaint is that turning gets a tiny bit touchy sometimes, even on my controller, but that may just be user error. I do await the full version, as the demo doesn’t offer everything, but as far as I am concerned with the demo, it’s got it’s gears (in a good way)!

Originally, I felt obligated to check out and review this game for something to do, then I wondered if I’d really get into it much. When I found how difficult the levels and their checkpoints progress to be, it annoyed me a bit, but I channeled that feeling into determination to retry the part again, whether I’d take a new or the same approach, or just avoid it. Really, the desire to come back for more really got me into it. The gradual difficulty of levels 1 and 2 inspired me to check out the last level just to see how far more difficult it’d be! On top of the amazing visuals and relaxing music, it’s rewarding to try over and over.

In all ado, the demo of Lost Orbit gives what the full version plans to bring, including focus on RPG elements, quite the curious potential, and so I’d deem it worth the play! With amazing visuals and its outer space setting, with a background of relaxing music, the gradual difficulty and reward will pull you back into its orbit for more!

PixelNAUTS’ outer-space obstacle course gets 9 splats out of 10!